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Ted and Sally

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Sally is a full-time mum who lives in Wiltshire with her two-year-old twins, Ted and Alex, and her partner, Neil

After a premature birth, Ted developed cerebral palsy which means that he can’t walk or stand unaided. Sally’s father is a freemason and got in touch with us to see if we could support the family in any way. Ted now has an ‘Upsee mobility harness’ that we part funded and allows him to walk with the help of his mum, meaning he can put his wellies on and enjoy the great outdoors with his brother!

Ted and Alex wake up at…

…7am. Ted is usually the first to get up – he’s keen to get downstairs! I carry Ted while Alex wanders down behind us. Ted likes to have Weetabix with banana for breakfast; he has a special chair so he can sit up and eat at the table with his brother.

I get the boys dressed…

…and put Ted into the Upsee. We spend the morning walking around the garden, which he loves – we have chickens so we take up a bucket of food and collect any eggs that have been laid overnight. I used to have to push Ted in a pushchair up the garden whilst Alex ran ahead, so it’s lovely to see him running up to the chicken coop with his brother

We spend a lot of time…

…outdoors! We have sheep opposite our drive so every morning we go to say hello. Ted loves stamping on the stones of our gravel drive and picking the dandelions, things that he used to watch Alex do and was desperate to join in. Being in the Upsee has really given him a sense of independence, which is so important for a growing child. We then have lunch, which is usually toast, crisps and fruit.

After lunch…

…we take a quick trip to the park and Ted enjoys telling me where to walk; he points to the roundabout or swings and says ‘way!’ which is my cue to take him to the next part of the playground.

Now Ted can stand…

…he loves to open gates and cupboards – it’s such a common thing for a two year old to do but a real novelty for him! It’s brilliant because when we get home from the park, I can get on with the washing up and he can entertain himself with the cupboard in front of him. Alex will come up and hold his hand and cuddle him – they love being at eye level with each other and it’s these moments that make having twins really special.

For dinner…

As a treat, I give the boys fish pie – Ted loves a good pie! He then spends some time with Daddy once he’s back from work, and tells him what he’s been up to that day. No matter what we’ve done, Ted usually says that he visited some goats… I don’t know where that comes from!

Bedtime…

…is usually around 7pm. We help Ted climb the stairs then both boys have a bedtime drink. You can hear them chat away and talk about their day, but soon enough they’re off to sleep.

Our Impact

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